Pain Relief for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Employees and individuals who work with their hands and wrists in repetitive movements on a daily basis oftentimes suffer from the early stages of carpal tunnel syndrome. Numbness, pain, tingling and weakness in the hand and fingers are early signs and it’s important to keep an eye on the area to prevent further damage. If you’re currently suffering from or looking to prevent carpal tunnel syndrome, our trained experts recommend the DonJoy ComfortFORM Wrist Support to stabilize strain.

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The contoured design of the brace fits the natural contours of the wrist and hands to provide the best in fit and support, allowing you to type, move and work just as you normally would. The adjustable straps and lightweight material also adds comfort while wearing the brace so you feel completely supported. Some braces on the market might make you feel like your wrist isn’t fully guarded, but the ConfortFORM incorporates aluminum palmer stays to control how much or little your wrist moves leaving you fully protected.

From ease of use, fully adjustable straps, durability and proper fit, the DonJoy ConfortFORM is a great solution for those looking to protect or heal themselves from carpal tunnel syndrome.

Pain Relief for Plantar Fasciitis

Chronic heel pain is no laughing matter and can sometimes be difficult to treat if not caught at the right time. If you’re suffering from Plantar Fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, or heel pain, the Aircast AirHeel Ankle Brace can help protect and support your ankle.

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The AirHeel is unique in its design and is composed of two interconnected aircells at the foot arch and at the back of the Achilles tendon. Pulsating compression from the aircells is applied to the heel with every step you make reducing swelling and enhancing blood circulation, all while providing comfort and support along the way. Strain on the tendon is reduced allowing you to feel secure with your movements and reduce the risk of further injury.

You’ll notice how lightweight and breathable the AirHeel’s fabric is the moment you put it on. The brace slips on easily like a sock and fits comfortably inside a sneaker or athletic shoe – you’ll never notice any bulkiness during wear. Whether you’re a professional athlete or just an active person looking to relieve some pain, the AirHeel brace may be your next best solution.

Aircast Airheel Ankle Brace
Aircast Airheel Ankle Brace

Aircast Airlift for PTTD

Since we’re always moving throughout our busy lives and always on our feet, it’s important to keep an eye on the health and well-being of our feet and legs as we get older. Some adults develop a flat foot, or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). The Aircast Airlift PTTD Brace is designed for PTTD.

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Aircast Airlift PTTD Brace

The brace works to realign and support the ankle. Depending on the severity of your condition, the brace can be used to prevent damage to the area, and used after surgery or during rehab. An aircell is located under the arch of the foot, and when adjusted, can create more of a natural foot position, further adding to your comfort. Additionally, the aircells can be adjusted while wearing shoes so that you can closely monitor the area and adjust the brace during use for comfort and stability. Anatomically designed semi-rigid shells are also incorporated into the design of the brace to secure ankle stability so you can walk normally.

Some foot braces require too many straps or a lace-up feature that’s too difficult to put on in a hurry. The Airlift is easy to put on from the rear, so you can slip your foot into simply without hindrance while two straps stabilize the position of your foot. The combination of ease of use, fully adjustable components and complete support and comfort make the Aircast Airlift PTTD Brace a great solution for flat feet.

Stay on the Green by Preventing Golf Injuries

GolfBBGolf is both a competitive sport and a relaxing pastime for young and old. Whether you play professionally or just as a way to unwind, golf is still a sport which can cause serious injury. Most golf injuries come from overuse; repetitive swinging motions that wear on muscles and joints which can lead to injury. However, like with most sports, injuries can be prevented if you have an understanding of what they are and what causes them. Simply a change in form can make all the difference.

 

Common Golf Injuries

Golfer’s Elbow

One of the most common golf injuries is Golfer’s Elbow or medial epicondylitis. Medial epicondylitis is an inflammation of the tendons that attach your forearm muscles to your elbow. Inflammation is caused by repeating the same motions — in this case, swinging a golf club — over and over again.

Lower Back Pain

Another common injury that golfers experience is lower back pain. Back pain can be caused by pulling or straining the muscles in your lower back during your swing or from carrying your golf bag. Also, people who suffer from chronic back pain might have difficulty with their golf game.

Wrist Injuries

Golfers often sustain wrists injuries. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is an overuse injury that affects the median nerve in your wrist. The median nerve travels from your wrist to your forearm through the carpal tunnel. In addition to the nerve, the carpal tunnel also contains flexor tendons so when swelling occurs, they put pressure on the median nerve. CTS can be minor to serious depending on the extent of the injury.

Another wrist injury golfers might experience is DeQuervain’s Tendinitis. DeQuervain’s Tendinitis is an inflammation of the tendons in the thumb, causing pain in the wrist near where your thumb connects to it.

Other wrist injuries include Wrist Impaction Syndrome, which is caused caused when the bones of the wrist bang into one another during repetitive movements and ECU Tendon Subluxation, which is when the sheath holding the wrist tendon begins sliding around.

Knee Pain

Knee pain and injury has plagued even professional golfers like Tiger Woods. It can be caused by any number of issues including arthritis, a torn meniscus or an ACL tear.

 

Prevention

There are several things you can do prior to stepping on the green to keep your golf game from being impacted by injury.

Warming up might seem a little silly since golf is a lower impact sport, but stretching and preparing your muscles before any sport is recommended. Stretch out your arms, back and legs. Practice your swing, starting off slowly at first to check your form.

If you are finding yourself sore after a round of golf, try conditioning between games. Light exercise like walking or jogging can help to strengthen your muscles, or try an electric muscle stimulator to help you recover from soreness but also build up muscles in your arms, legs and back to reduce your risk of injury.

Make sure your swing isn’t the issue. Swinging a golf club is a full body motion, utilizing multiple muscle groups as you simultaneously turn your body while hitting the ball. Think to yourself: how’s my posture? Are my feet shoulder-width apart? Am I hunching over? Having proper form before you swing can help reduce the risk of injury. When you do hit the ball, make sure your swing is fluid. Don’t try to hit the ball too hard. Harder swings don’t necessarily mean a better game. Work on having a smooth, consistent tempo.

If you’re carrying your own bag, make sure to keep your back straight and use the strength of your legs to lift. This will help reduce the risk of back injury.

Proper footwear is also key. Just like with soccer, having the right cleats is important. Golf shoes with short cleats are recommended. Long cleats can dig too far into the ground, locking your foot down when you swing which can lead to knee injuries like a torn ACL.

With the right preparation, golf can be a fun, relaxing game. Stay safe and keep swinging!

 

Sources:

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00137

http://www.med.nyu.edu/pmr/residency/resources/PMR%20clinics%20NA/PMR%20clinics%20NA_sports%20med/golf%20injuries%20and%20rehab.pdf

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/fitness/in-depth/golf/art-20047434

http://golf.about.com/od/fitnesshealth/tp/commoninjuries.htm

http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/sports-and-spine-injuries/golf-and-low-back-pain

http://www.cybergolf.com/golf_news/carpal_tunnel_syndrome_golf

Knee Injuries: More Common in Women?

knee pain women

Knee injuries are no laughing matter; 55% of all sports related injuries are knee injuries. But who is at greatest risk for knee injuries when it comes to sports? It turns out that women are 4-6 times more likely to suffer a sports related injury than their male counterparts in the same sport. Out of all sports related injuries, the most common injuries among female athletes are anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries.

The reasons for women having an increased risk of knee injury has nothing to do with strength or ability; it comes down to genetics and anatomical factors, form, and training. Simply put, women are built differently than men and some of those differences put added pressure on their knee joints. Thankfully, the factors contributing to the increase in injuries have been widely researched and while genetics can’t be changed, form corrections and training programs have been proven to prevent knee injuries in women’s sports.

Within the sports community, female athletes who play basketball and soccer are somewhere between 2-10 times more likely to suffer an ACL injury compared with male athletes, according to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. The reason for the high rate of ACL injuries within these particular sports can be attributed to that most ACL injuries—whether in male or female athletes— are caused by non contact mechanisms. These include common movements like landing from a jump or making a lateral pivot while running. But why are women so susceptible to ACL injuries? Let’s take a look at the factors and what can be done to reduce the risk.

Genetic and Anatomical Factors:

ACL

The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of the four major ligaments of the knee. It connects the front of the tibia (shinbone) with the back of the femur (thighbone). It helps provide stability to the knee joint.

The strength and use of the surrounding muscle groups, such as quadriceps and hamstrings, have a serious impact on the ACL. When running and jumping, women tend to lead with their quads, whereas male athletes seem to have a better balance between the quads and the hamstring muscles. A balance between quads and hamstrings means the impact is more evenly distributed, thus reducing the pressure on the knee.

Another reason for increased knee pressure is that women have a wider pelvis which creates a larger Q-angle at the knee. This often results in a more “knock-kneed” posture in women, leaving the ACL more vulnerable for injury.

Q_Angle_knee

(image via http://blog.footsmart.com)

Additional anatomical factors in ACL tears such as the diameter of the ACL are still being researched.

Some doctors think women are more prone an ACL injury because of the differences in the amount of circulating hormones such as estrogen. Certain hormones give ligaments strength and flexibility. Fluctuations in hormone levels may have some impact on the function of the nerves and muscles and may lead to an increased risk of injury.

Form:

When researchers at the Loyola University Medical Center sought to explain why this increased risk of ACL injuries in women was occurring, they uncovered that poor form when landing a jump contributed to the risk.

“Women tend to land with the knees straighter and feet rotated inwards, compared to men who tend to land with more of a bend in the knee and the feet rotated slightly outward,” says Dr. Patrick McCulloch, an orthopedic surgeon with the Methodist Center for Sports Medicine in Houston who was involved in the research. “This puts the knee in a better position to absorb shock.”

After this discovery, the same researchers spent six weeks correcting these form issues resulted in a reduction in the likelihood of ACL injury by up to 50%.

Prevention Through Training:

As doctors and orthopedic surgeons were seeing an increase in ACL injuries in women, training and conditioning programs were designed to correct problems with form, strengthen knees and surrounding muscles and reduce the risk of injury. FIFA, the governing body of the World Cup and other international soccer tournaments, has designed a warm up program specifically designed to reduce the rate of ACL injuries in soccer players (male and female).

Teams that perform FIFA 11+  program at least twice a week, for 20 minutes at time, experience 30-50% fewer injured players, according to FIFA.

In addition, the Sports Physical Therapy department at Massachusetts General Hospital have put together a detailed sports conditioning program to help increase knee strength and reduce knee injuries specifically in female athletes through active warm-up, stretching, strengthening exercises, plyometric drills, and agility drills.

While ACL injuries for female athletes were reaching epidemic proportions, through understanding the problems causing the increase and creating prevention programs based on research, the rate of these injuries is on the decline.

Sources:

http://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/a_females_aching_knees/

http://www.prevention.com/fitness/strength-training/risk-knee-injury-increases-women

http://loyolamedicine.org/newswire/features/sports-medicine-surgeon-urges-girls-soccer-teams-try-acl-tear-prevention-drills

http://wcbe.org/post/epidemic-knee-injuries-young-female-athletes

http://www.aaos.org/news/aaosnow/nov10/research3.asp

http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/Orthopaedics/clinicalservices/sportsmed/Documents/WISH_SPORTSMED_Female%20Knee%20Injuries%20and%20ACL.pdf

http://www.athletestrengthandperformance.com/acl-anatomy-gender-disparity/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2465242/

http://www.atipt.com/news-media/blog/acl-tears-and-knee-pain-more-common-women-activity