Prevent ACL Injuries

Did you know women are between 2 and 10 times more likely to injure their ACL?  Wearing a DonJoy knee brace like the Playmaker II with a FourcePoint hinge reduces your chance of on an ACL injury. This knee brace has been proven to decrease your chance of injuring your ACL from a non-contact injury by 60%! And wearing this brace helps train you to utilize the right degree of flexion (how much you bend your knee) so you’re less likely to injure your ACL even if you’re not wearing this brace.

Learn more about the DonJoy Playmaker II with FourcePoint Hinge

Preventing Sports Injuries in High School Students

PreventingInjuryHS Preventing Sports Injuries in High School Students

As parents, your children’s safety is a top priority. According to ESPN, 21.47 million kids between 6 and 17 play organized sports. That’s more than the population of the state of New York.

Sports are great for young people for many reasons; being part of a team, staying active, college scholarships, etc. But with any physical activity, there is a risk of injury. In fact, high school athletes get injured about as often as professional athletes do. Some of the most common injuries occur because many athletes are still growing during their high school years. Bones grow first, causing an uneven growth pattern that pulls on tendons and muscles, increasing the chance of injury. However, there are simple steps you can take to help reduce that chance.

Proper Equipment

Many sports — football, baseball, hockey, soccer, etc — require certain protective gear to play. Make sure all gear fits properly and is in good condition.

If your child has been previously injured, make sure they have the proper support, brace, or protective gear to reduce the chance of repeat or further injury.

Warming Up

Warming up is important for anyone playing a sport. A proper warm up includes stretching before heading out on the field, court or ice. Warm ups increase muscle and tendon flexibility, helping to avoid injuries like pulls and tears.

Conditioning prior to the start of a sports season can help a high school athlete avoid injury during the season. The chance of injury increases when an athlete has a sudden increase in their level of activity that their body is not prepared for. Starting gradually and working up to a full training program is best to get back in playing shape.

Stay Hydrated

Make sure your young athlete drinks plenty of fluids (water or sports drinks) before, during, and after the game.

Don’t Over Do It

Limit the number of sports your high school student plays a season and make sure they take time off. Children and teens who play more than one sport during a season are at greater risk of injury from overuse. Injuries from overuse are common even in adults. If your child is dedicated to a single sport, try to take a couple months off between seasons. Year-round training can lead to overuse injuries as well.

Got other tips for preventing sports injuries? Let us know in the comments!

 

Sources:

Improve Your Health By Walking

Benefits of Walking Improve Your Health By Walking

Staying active is one of the best ways to prevent health concerns down the road but you don’t have to be a fitness fanatic to improve your health. The benefits of walking are well documented. Research has shown that even walking for 30 minutes a day can lead to better health by doing the following:

  • Reducing the risk of coronary heart disease
  • Reducing the risk of Type 2 Diabetes
  • Improving blood pressure
  • Improving blood sugar levels
  • Strengthening your bones
  • Helping you maintain a healthy body weight / lowering your risk of obesity
  • Helping you relax and de-stress

According to the Stroke Association, walking briskly for up to 30 minutes each day can help prevent and control the high blood pressure that can cause strokes – reducing your risk by up to 27%!

Want to know more about how walking can improve your health? Check out Dr Comfort’s full post on how to walk your way a healthier life (including proper technique to avoid walking related injury): https://www.drcomfort.com/blog/ 

How to Keep Your Soccer Career Alive and Kicking

Soccer How to Keep Your Soccer Career Alive and Kicking

Soccer (or football) is arguably the most popular sport in the world. With the largest worldwide soccer tournament less than a week away, we’re taking a look at the most common soccer-related injuries and how to prevent them.

Hands-down the most common injury from soccer is a sprained ankle. Between running with the ball, maneuvering around opposing players or even being kicked by them, this is not a surprise. And while a sprained ankle might sideline you, it’s important to give it enough time to heal before getting back on the field.

Knee injuries are also common in soccer and often more severe.  One of the most dreaded knee injuries soccer players can experience is a tear in their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) near the knee.  According to FIFA, seventy per cent of all ACL injuries happen without contact with another player. An injury like a torn ACL could require surgery to repair.

Moving up from the knee, hamstring (the muscle group in the back of your thigh) injuries are fairly typical, especially for players in positions that require sprinting or sudden acceleration like forward and midfield. Injuries can range for a more mild pull to a more serious tear.

So how do you prevent injuries on the soccer field? Proper warm ups are crucial. Making sure your muscles are stretched out and limber is key to preventing pulls and tears. FIFA has created a soccer warm  up program designed specifically to help reduce the risk of injury on the field.

Staying active in the off-season and gradually working up to peak performance is another way to avoid injury. Injuries are much more likely for players who have not trained or played for a period of time. If you’ve been out of the game for a while, ease back into it. Work on your conditioning and strength training as you gradually get back into full contact soccer. On that same note, do not overtrain. Many injuries come from overuse, particularly in young players. If you are starting to feel worn down, listen to your body and take some time off. Taking one season off could help you extend your soccer career by many more seasons.

Sources:

http://www.fifa.com/aboutfifa/footballdevelopment/medical/playershealth/injuries/commoninjuries/index.html

http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/soccer-injury-prevention.aspx

 

 

 

“BraceGate”: Should Sergio Martinez be allowed to wear a knee brace in the ring?

734124559 563ecd801d z 300x225 “BraceGate”: Should Sergio Martinez be allowed to wear a knee brace in the ring?Sergio Martinez is set to fight Miguel Cotto this weekend in Madison Square Garden. The usual conversation of who is going to take the win and in what round has changed over the last few days. WBC Middleweight Champion Martinez (51-2-2, 28 KO’s) will not be allowed to wear a knee brace in the ring.

The surprising decision to not permit Martinez, who had a second surgery on his right knee last April, came from the New York State Athletic Commission, but the reasons for their ruling are unclear. In 2010, the NYSAC allowed Yuri Foreman to fight Cotto with a knee brace on.

Some have speculated that the need for a knee brace indicates that Martinez in not 100% physically able to compete. Others believe it will give him some kind of advantage by giving him additional knee support. On the flipside, there are some who think it will give Cotto the upper hand, being able to clearly identify a potential weakness in his opponent. But is protecting an previous injury some kind of advantage or a smart medical decision?

Preventing knee reinjury is crucial for any athlete looking to keep their career going and to not suffer from chronic pain long after their fighting days are over. We see knee braces in professional sports everyday; why should the boxing ring be any different?

Let us know what you think in the comments.