Best Knee Brace for Soccer – DonJoy Playmaker II

With all of the switching, kicking, colliding with other players and running at high speeds involved in soccer, it’s no wonder that so many players develop knee injuries over time. Even the mildest of ligament strains can bring a player down and force him or her out of the game for an extended amount of time. Our trained experts recommend the DonJoy Playmaker II Knee Brace to help heal and prevent ACL, MCL and LCL instabilities and injuries.

BetterBracesBanner9 Best Knee Brace for Soccer   DonJoy Playmaker II

The DonJoy Playmaker II Knee Brace offers more comfort than traditional braces because it’s created from a high-performance, durable and breathable nylon and spandex blend, allowing you to move on the field like normal. The brace also uses a hinge design to prevent overextension, minimizing the risk of injury even more. Even Megan Rapinoe, Olympic gold medalist for the U.S. Women’s Soccer Team, wears the brace to further protect her from ACL injuries.

The versatile strapping is comfortable and adjustable, making recovery or prevention of injury easy and unrestrained. Whether you’re treating chronic ankle instabilities or need a brace for preventative measures, the DonJoy Playmaker II Knee Brace is right for you. Available in a Sleeve or Wrap design, the brace provides the protection and support to get you back in the game so that you can play stronger and longer.

Best Soccer Ankle Brace – Aircast A60

There’s no doubt that soccer players are the most athletic in the world of sports so it’s important to protect and prevent any injury while on the field. Running nonstop for almost two hours is hard on the body, especially the ankles. Wearing a proper ankle brace will help to prevent injury and help to soothe pain from previous muscle, bone and tendon damage. If you’re a pro or novice soccer player who is prone to injury, our trained experts recommend the Aircast A60 Ankle Support for ankle injury prevention.

BetterBracesBanner8 Best Soccer Ankle Brace   Aircast A60

The Aircast A60 Ankle Support works to give you reinforcement where you need it the most to prevent a sprained or injured ankle. The brace protects the weakest point of your ankle so you can run, kick and change directions with lightning speed just as you normally would. Additionally, the unique design of the brace utilizes a stabilizer on each side of the ankle to prevent sprains and rollovers, while reducing the risk of overextension.

Soccer players love how comfortable the A60 truly is compared to other braces on the market. Your ankle is properly supported and stays dry keeping you comfortably cool. The lightweight brace easily fits in any athletic shoe adding to extra comfort so you can run and play as if you were wearing an ordinary sock. The single strap application takes seconds to apply so you can get into the game quickly. If you want to prevent ankle injury and protect weak tendons, the Aircast A60 Ankle Support is right for you. Don’t let a twisted or rolled ankle keep you out of the game and on the sidelines.

Knee Injuries: More Common in Women?

knee pain women Knee Injuries: More Common in Women?

Knee injuries are no laughing matter; 55% of all sports related injuries are knee injuries. But who is at greatest risk for knee injuries when it comes to sports? It turns out that women are 4-6 times more likely to suffer a sports related injury than their male counterparts in the same sport. Out of all sports related injuries, the most common injuries among female athletes are anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries.

The reasons for women having an increased risk of knee injury has nothing to do with strength or ability; it comes down to genetics and anatomical factors, form, and training. Simply put, women are built differently than men and some of those differences put added pressure on their knee joints. Thankfully, the factors contributing to the increase in injuries have been widely researched and while genetics can’t be changed, form corrections and training programs have been proven to prevent knee injuries in women’s sports.

Within the sports community, female athletes who play basketball and soccer are somewhere between 2-10 times more likely to suffer an ACL injury compared with male athletes, according to the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. The reason for the high rate of ACL injuries within these particular sports can be attributed to that most ACL injuries—whether in male or female athletes— are caused by non contact mechanisms. These include common movements like landing from a jump or making a lateral pivot while running. But why are women so susceptible to ACL injuries? Let’s take a look at the factors and what can be done to reduce the risk.

Genetic and Anatomical Factors:

ACL Knee Injuries: More Common in Women?

The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, is one of the four major ligaments of the knee. It connects the front of the tibia (shinbone) with the back of the femur (thighbone). It helps provide stability to the knee joint.

The strength and use of the surrounding muscle groups, such as quadriceps and hamstrings, have a serious impact on the ACL. When running and jumping, women tend to lead with their quads, whereas male athletes seem to have a better balance between the quads and the hamstring muscles. A balance between quads and hamstrings means the impact is more evenly distributed, thus reducing the pressure on the knee.

Another reason for increased knee pressure is that women have a wider pelvis which creates a larger Q-angle at the knee. This often results in a more “knock-kneed” posture in women, leaving the ACL more vulnerable for injury.

Q Angle 600 Knee Injuries: More Common in Women?

(image via http://blog.footsmart.com)

Additional anatomical factors in ACL tears such as the diameter of the ACL are still being researched.

Some doctors think women are more prone an ACL injury because of the differences in the amount of circulating hormones such as estrogen. Certain hormones give ligaments strength and flexibility. Fluctuations in hormone levels may have some impact on the function of the nerves and muscles and may lead to an increased risk of injury.

Form:

When researchers at the Loyola University Medical Center sought to explain why this increased risk of ACL injuries in women was occurring, they uncovered that poor form when landing a jump contributed to the risk.

“Women tend to land with the knees straighter and feet rotated inwards, compared to men who tend to land with more of a bend in the knee and the feet rotated slightly outward,” says Dr. Patrick McCulloch, an orthopedic surgeon with the Methodist Center for Sports Medicine in Houston who was involved in the research. “This puts the knee in a better position to absorb shock.”

After this discovery, the same researchers spent six weeks correcting these form issues resulted in a reduction in the likelihood of ACL injury by up to 50%.

Prevention Through Training:

As doctors and orthopedic surgeons were seeing an increase in ACL injuries in women, training and conditioning programs were designed to correct problems with form, strengthen knees and surrounding muscles and reduce the risk of injury. FIFA, the governing body of the World Cup and other international soccer tournaments, has designed a warm up program specifically designed to reduce the rate of ACL injuries in soccer players (male and female).

Teams that perform FIFA 11+  program at least twice a week, for 20 minutes at time, experience 30-50% fewer injured players, according to FIFA.

In addition, the Sports Physical Therapy department at Massachusetts General Hospital have put together a detailed sports conditioning program to help increase knee strength and reduce knee injuries specifically in female athletes through active warm-up, stretching, strengthening exercises, plyometric drills, and agility drills.

While ACL injuries for female athletes were reaching epidemic proportions, through understanding the problems causing the increase and creating prevention programs based on research, the rate of these injuries is on the decline.

Sources:

http://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/a_females_aching_knees/

http://www.prevention.com/fitness/strength-training/risk-knee-injury-increases-women

http://loyolamedicine.org/newswire/features/sports-medicine-surgeon-urges-girls-soccer-teams-try-acl-tear-prevention-drills

http://wcbe.org/post/epidemic-knee-injuries-young-female-athletes

http://www.aaos.org/news/aaosnow/nov10/research3.asp

http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/Orthopaedics/clinicalservices/sportsmed/Documents/WISH_SPORTSMED_Female%20Knee%20Injuries%20and%20ACL.pdf

http://www.athletestrengthandperformance.com/acl-anatomy-gender-disparity/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2465242/

http://www.atipt.com/news-media/blog/acl-tears-and-knee-pain-more-common-women-activity

How to Keep Your Soccer Career Alive and Kicking

Soccer How to Keep Your Soccer Career Alive and Kicking

Soccer (or football) is arguably the most popular sport in the world. With the largest worldwide soccer tournament less than a week away, we’re taking a look at the most common soccer-related injuries and how to prevent them.

Hands-down the most common injury from soccer is a sprained ankle. Between running with the ball, maneuvering around opposing players or even being kicked by them, this is not a surprise. And while a sprained ankle might sideline you, it’s important to give it enough time to heal before getting back on the field.

Knee injuries are also common in soccer and often more severe.  One of the most dreaded knee injuries soccer players can experience is a tear in their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) near the knee.  According to FIFA, seventy per cent of all ACL injuries happen without contact with another player. An injury like a torn ACL could require surgery to repair.

Moving up from the knee, hamstring (the muscle group in the back of your thigh) injuries are fairly typical, especially for players in positions that require sprinting or sudden acceleration like forward and midfield. Injuries can range for a more mild pull to a more serious tear.

So how do you prevent injuries on the soccer field? Proper warm ups are crucial. Making sure your muscles are stretched out and limber is key to preventing pulls and tears. FIFA has created a soccer warm  up program designed specifically to help reduce the risk of injury on the field.

Staying active in the off-season and gradually working up to peak performance is another way to avoid injury. Injuries are much more likely for players who have not trained or played for a period of time. If you’ve been out of the game for a while, ease back into it. Work on your conditioning and strength training as you gradually get back into full contact soccer. On that same note, do not overtrain. Many injuries come from overuse, particularly in young players. If you are starting to feel worn down, listen to your body and take some time off. Taking one season off could help you extend your soccer career by many more seasons.

Sources:

http://www.fifa.com/aboutfifa/footballdevelopment/medical/playershealth/injuries/commoninjuries/index.html

http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/soccer-injury-prevention.aspx

 

 

 

Soccer Ankle Injuries

Soccer ankle injuries such as ankle sprains and ankle strains are very common. All it takes is stepping on uneven ground or on another player’s foot, and you can roll your ankle.  Sometimes soccer athletes go up for a header and land precariously on their feet, leading to further ankle injuries.

Wearing soccer ankle braces can help prevent injuries on the field. Combined with regular training, ankle braces can keep you healthy through the whole soccer season. Here are some of our top soccer ankle braces:

DonJoy Stabilizing Ankle Brace – Often heralded as the best soccer ankle brace, the DonJoy Stabilizing Ankle does exactly what its name says! It’s especially lightweight so it won’t inhibit movement.

Aircast A60 Ankle Brace – This brace comes with stabilizers at each side of the ankle, supporting the ankle at its weakest points. One of our bestsellers!

Aircast Airsport Ankle Brace – This brace is great for soccer and other sports as well. The Aircast Airsport is versatile, and supports your ankle and foot with unique cushioning aircells.

Don’t skimp on ankle protection when you play soccer — check out our soccer ankle braces today!