Pain Relief for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Employees and individuals who work with their hands and wrists in repetitive movements on a daily basis oftentimes suffer from the early stages of carpal tunnel syndrome. Numbness, pain, tingling and weakness in the hand and fingers are early signs and it’s important to keep an eye on the area to prevent further damage. If you’re currently suffering from or looking to prevent carpal tunnel syndrome, our trained experts recommend the DonJoy ComfortFORM Wrist Support to stabilize strain.

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The contoured design of the brace fits the natural contours of the wrist and hands to provide the best in fit and support, allowing you to type, move and work just as you normally would. The adjustable straps and lightweight material also adds comfort while wearing the brace so you feel completely supported. Some braces on the market might make you feel like your wrist isn’t fully guarded, but the ConfortFORM incorporates aluminum palmer stays to control how much or little your wrist moves leaving you fully protected.

From ease of use, fully adjustable straps, durability and proper fit, the DonJoy ConfortFORM is a great solution for those looking to protect or heal themselves from carpal tunnel syndrome.

Pain Relief for Plantar Fasciitis

Chronic heel pain is no laughing matter and can sometimes be difficult to treat if not caught at the right time. If you’re suffering from Plantar Fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, or heel pain, the Aircast AirHeel Ankle Brace can help protect your ankle and ease any current pain.

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The AirHeel is unique in its design and is composed of two interconnected aircells at the foot arch and at the back of the Achilles tendon. Pulsating compression from the aircells is applied to the heel with every step you make reducing swelling and enhancing blood circulation, all while providing comfort and support along the way. Strain on the tendon is reduced allowing you to feel secure with your movements and reduce the risk of further injury.

You’ll notice how lightweight and breathable the AirHeel’s fabric is the moment you put it on. The brace slips on easily like a sock and fits comfortably inside a sneaker or athletic shoe – you’ll never notice any bulkiness during wear. Whether you’re a professional athlete or just an active person looking to relieve some pain, the AirHeel brace may be your next best solution.

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Aircast Airheel Ankle Brace

Tennis Elbow Support – Aircast Pneumatic Armband

The repetitive movements in the game of tennis are hard on all players, no matter their skill level. While other athletes can run, jump, switchback and have other movements on a huge field, tennis players focus on just a few movements, which can thus lead to tennis elbow, or an inflamed or irritated outer side of the elbow. Our trained experts recommend the Aircast Pneumatic Armband for tennis players looking to protect themselves from tennis elbow or provide some relief while playing.

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The Aircast Pneumatic Armband is great for those looking to proactively support their elbows in ways that stretching and warming up simply cannot. The armband helps to prevent irritation and overextension with its unique and comfortable design so you can get back to playing as normal. The armband’s unique, built-in air pocket provides gentle compression along the extensor muscle to relieve stress without preventing blood flow, so you can swing for balls like normal.

The armband is compact and it won’t get in the way or become a distraction like other braces and armbands currently on the market. The armband conforms to the natural shape of the elbow and has a soft, foam lining so it’s comfortable while you’re playing. Range of motion is a priority for tennis players at all levels and the Aircast Pneumatic Armband will allow you to play normally while also protecting your muscles and tendons.

Aircast Airlift for PTTD

Since we’re always moving throughout our busy lives and always on our feet, it’s important to keep an eye on the health and well-being of our feet and legs as we get older. Some adults develop a flat foot, or posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). Feet and ankle bones and tendons can wear over time so if you’re suffering from the early stages or rehabbing PTTD, our trained experts recommend the Aircast Airlift PTTD Brace.

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Aircast Airlift PTTD Brace

The brace works to realign and support the ankle to get your foot feeling as healthy as possible. Depending on the severity of your condition, the brace can be used to prevent PTTD from developing, prevent further damage to the area, and used after surgery or during rehab. An aircell is located under the arch of the foot, and when adjusted, can create more of a natural foot position, further adding to your comfort. Additionally, the aircells can be adjusted while wearing shoes so that you can closely monitor the area and adjust the brace during use for superior comfort and stability. Anatomically designed semi-rigid shells are also incorporated into the design of the brace to secure ankle stability so you can walk normally.

Some foot braces require too many straps or a lace-up feature that’s too difficult to put on in a hurry. The Airlift is easy to put on from the rear, so you can slip your foot into simply without hindrance while two straps stabilize the position of your foot. The combination of ease of use, fully adjustable components and complete support and comfort make the Aircast Airlift PTTD Brace a great solution for flat feet.

Stay on the Green by Preventing Golf Injuries

GolfBB Stay on the Green by Preventing Golf InjuriesGolf is both a competitive sport and a relaxing pastime for young and old. Whether you play professionally or just as a way to unwind, golf is still a sport which can cause serious injury. Most golf injuries come from overuse; repetitive swinging motions that wear on muscles and joints which can lead to injury. However, like with most sports, injuries can be prevented if you have an understanding of what they are and what causes them. Simply a change in form can make all the difference.

 

Common Golf Injuries

Golfer’s Elbow

One of the most common golf injuries is Golfer’s Elbow or medial epicondylitis. Medial epicondylitis is an inflammation of the tendons that attach your forearm muscles to your elbow. Inflammation is caused by repeating the same motions — in this case, swinging a golf club — over and over again.

Lower Back Pain

Another common injury that golfers experience is lower back pain. Back pain can be caused by pulling or straining the muscles in your lower back during your swing or from carrying your golf bag. Also, people who suffer from chronic back pain might have difficulty with their golf game.

Wrist Injuries

Golfers often sustain wrists injuries. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is an overuse injury that affects the median nerve in your wrist. The median nerve travels from your wrist to your forearm through the carpal tunnel. In addition to the nerve, the carpal tunnel also contains flexor tendons so when swelling occurs, they put pressure on the median nerve. CTS can be minor to serious depending on the extent of the injury.

Another wrist injury golfers might experience is DeQuervain’s Tendinitis. DeQuervain’s Tendinitis is an inflammation of the tendons in the thumb, causing pain in the wrist near where your thumb connects to it.

Other wrist injuries include Wrist Impaction Syndrome, which is caused caused when the bones of the wrist bang into one another during repetitive movements and ECU Tendon Subluxation, which is when the sheath holding the wrist tendon begins sliding around.

Knee Pain

Knee pain and injury has plagued even professional golfers like Tiger Woods. It can be caused by any number of issues including arthritis, a torn meniscus or an ACL tear.

 

Prevention

There are several things you can do prior to stepping on the green to keep your golf game from being impacted by injury.

Warming up might seem a little silly since golf is a lower impact sport, but stretching and preparing your muscles before any sport is recommended. Stretch out your arms, back and legs. Practice your swing, starting off slowly at first to check your form.

If you are finding yourself sore after a round of golf, try conditioning between games. Light exercise like walking or jogging can help to strengthen your muscles, or try an electric muscle stimulator to help you recover from soreness but also build up muscles in your arms, legs and back to reduce your risk of injury.

Make sure your swing isn’t the issue. Swinging a golf club is a full body motion, utilizing multiple muscle groups as you simultaneously turn your body while hitting the ball. Think to yourself: how’s my posture? Are my feet shoulder-width apart? Am I hunching over? Having proper form before you swing can help reduce the risk of injury. When you do hit the ball, make sure your swing is fluid. Don’t try to hit the ball too hard. Harder swings don’t necessarily mean a better game. Work on having a smooth, consistent tempo.

If you’re carrying your own bag, make sure to keep your back straight and use the strength of your legs to lift. This will help reduce the risk of back injury.

Proper footwear is also key. Just like with soccer, having the right cleats is important. Golf shoes with short cleats are recommended. Long cleats can dig too far into the ground, locking your foot down when you swing which can lead to knee injuries like a torn ACL.

With the right preparation, golf can be a fun, relaxing game. Stay safe and keep swinging!

 

Sources:

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00137

http://www.med.nyu.edu/pmr/residency/resources/PMR%20clinics%20NA/PMR%20clinics%20NA_sports%20med/golf%20injuries%20and%20rehab.pdf

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/fitness/in-depth/golf/art-20047434

http://golf.about.com/od/fitnesshealth/tp/commoninjuries.htm

http://www.spine-health.com/conditions/sports-and-spine-injuries/golf-and-low-back-pain

http://www.cybergolf.com/golf_news/carpal_tunnel_syndrome_golf