Featured Product: DonJoy Back Brace

donjoy back brace 1 Featured Product: DonJoy Back Brace

DonJoy Back Brace

Back problems are the most common cause of job-related disability in the United States. Almost 80% of people experience lower back pain at some point in their lives. One of the ways to counter back pain is by wearing a back brace. That’s why we recommend the DonJoy Back Brace.

The DonJoy Back Brace is designed with the patient in mind, for maximum comfort and ease of use. It includes a breathable outer mesh that allows heat to escape without compromising the strength of its support. It reinforces the lower back by providing compression and stability to reduce the load on your spine. The compression can be easily adjusted by pulling the side handle. This accommodates for various activities, clothing types or weight fluctuations. It’s also simple to put on and can be worn above, between, or under clothing making it ideal for everyday wear.

If you’re looking for a great all-around lower back brace, check out the DonJoy Back Brace today!

Prevent Back Pain From Gardening

Holly B. is an active professional in her late twenties who spends her free time playing recreational flag football and league basketball. She recently tore her ACL and will be sharing her experiences with us as she works towards getting back into sports.

I still remember when I was younger how a pair of elderly ladies commented about the way I was bent over in the flowerbed, “Oh, your back will be regretting that one day.” I had no idea what they meant.

Now that I’m recovering from my ACL reconstruction surgery, I’m more aware of how the various activities I participate in can affect my body – especially gardening. Since I’ve had some free time during my ACL recovery, I’ve looked up some ways to prevent back pain from gardening.

  • Keep your back straight. When you’re weeding, get down on your knees or kneel on one leg. Lean forward to get the weeds and keep your back hollow. Don’t stoop over. Think of your torso as one solid unit.
  • Use a gardening stool. If you suffer from knee pain or can’t kneel, this is a good alternative. Try to keep your back hollow as you work. This is how I’ve managed to tone down the weeds in my yard, even though I’ve only been out of surgery for a month!
  • Wear a back brace. A back brace provides compression and helps keep your spine in the proper position. It also serves as a reminder to keep your back straight.
  • Warm up and stretch before gardening. I know you’re not going for a jog, but it will keep your muscles limber as you move around in the yard.
  • Mix up what you’re doing. Change up your activities in the garden. Weed for 10 minutes, then water some plants, then trim the suckers off your tree, etc. It gets hot out there so it’s a good excuse for a water break!
  • Get the right tools. I spent hours trying to dig up some weeds. Then my mother-in-law hacked at the ground with a pickaxe and the weeds came up out of the loosened dirt with no problem. Sounds silly, but it saved me from having to bend over for long periods of time.

Long hours in the hot sun, stooped over and pulling at weeds, or digging up rocks to plant some new flowers… all of this can have a negative effect on my back. I’m hoping the measures I take now will help in the long run!

References:
About.com – Back & Neck
FitSugar.com
Virginia Tech

Back Injuries in Ice Hockey

Hockey is a fast-paced, full contact sport, which makes hockey players prone to injuries. What most people may not be aware of, is that back injuries are prevalent among hockey players, even for those who play in leagues that don’t allow contact or body checking (using the body to knock an opponent with the puck against the boards or to the ice).

Hockey players are constantly bent over, looking down at the puck, aiming, and hitting it. This constant bending motion can cause aches and pains in the lower back. And of course, ice is slippery, so there is always the risk of back injury from slipping and falling. For hockey leagues that do allow contact, impact with other players can twist your back and cause injury.

Hockey braces can help prevent back injuries on the rink. Here are two back braces our brace coaches recommend for hockey:

Herniated Disk Injury and Prevention

Herniated disk, also known as slipped disk, occurs when all or part of a disk in the spine presses against nearby nerves. This can cause tingling, aches, and severe pain. Herniated disk injuries are one of the most common problems that 30-year old people have. In fact, according to the Indiana Spine Group, almost 250,000 herniated disks are repaired each year.

Most herniated disks occur in the back. Wearing a back brace for herniated disk can help prevent injury by providing compression and stability. Sometimes herniated disks can occur in the neck, such as in Colts quarterback Payton Manning. Typically after a herniated disk injury in the neck, patients will wear a cervical collar to stabilize the area while it heals.

In addition to wearing a back brace, practice proper lifting techniques at work and at home. You can also ask your doctor for ways to strengthen your abdominal and back muscles.

How to Alleviate Pregnancy Back Pain

According to BabyCenter.com, as many as three-quarters of pregnant women experience back pain at some point, especially during the later months of pregnancy. Most of this pain is in the lower back and is attributed to the expanding uterus, change in weight and also hormones. Here are some things you can do to alleviate or reduce pregnancy back pain:

Stretching and Strengthening Exercises – Always talk to your doctor before starting an exercise program, because some pregnancy situations may need you to limit exercise. Strengthening and stretching the back can help the muscles and joints that support your back and legs. You can also consider swimming and walking because they are low impact and relaxing.

Wear a Pregnancy Back Brace – Pregnancy back braces provide compression and support where you need it most. They encourage proper posture and also help prevent your ligaments from shifting unnaturally. We recommend the DonJoy Maternity Belt because it helps support both your stomach and your back through all stages of pregnancy.

Wear the Right Shoes – No high heels. As your belly grows your posture changes, and wearing high heels can increase the pressure on your back. Wear comfortable shoes that provide support to the arches of your feet.

Proper Body Mechanics – Be aware of how you are moving – especially when standing or sitting, or when getting out of bed. Keep a straight posture to alleviate pressure on your spine and lower back. Remember to bend your knees when picking up items.

Take it Easy - It’s important to get enough sleep and to take breaks after standing for long periods of time. Avoid carrying heavy objects and divide the weight of items you are carrying when you have to – especially those groceries. And if you really want to relax, treat yourself to a prenatal massage (or ask your partner for one!).