ACL Reconstruction Surgery: 2 Years Post-Op

Holly B. is an active professional in her late twenties who spends her free time playing recreational flag football and league basketball. She shares her experience with us as she explores the world of sports.

It’s been nearly two years since my ACL surgery and I thought it would be helpful for anyone considering ACL repair or who is currently recovering from ACL surgery to share my progress. Well, what I’ve learned is that ACL recovery varies greatly from person to person. From my own experience and opinion, it depends on two factors: your body and your effort.

Honestly, I haven’t done too much in terms of getting back into sports since my ACL reconstruction surgery. Real life took over – work and parenting – so I didn’t have as much time to devote to recreational sports. Ideally I think I would continue strengthening the muscle area around my knee before returning to sports to help stabilize the joint. I’d also feel more comfortable returning to sports with an ACL knee brace. It would help give me peace of mind that I’m lowering my risk of re-injury and it would provide support to my knee.

Could I start playing basketball and football again? Yes, I think so with some training. Overall I’ve healed up nicely – I’d say that my body rebounded well, but I haven’t put any effort into getting back into physical activity. That’s probably the only thing that slowed my progress.

Here’s some situations from my friends who have had ACL surgery:

  • Man in his early 20s – He put lots of effort into his ACL recovery in order to return to playing sports. He now wears an ACL knee brace and was back to playing sports within his first year. In fact, he started light running again around four months post-op… I’m not sure his doctor would have liked that!
  • Woman around my age in her late 20s – She tore her ACL around the same time I did, and she’s started working out consistently and is fairly active. Her recovery was slower… I think my body rebounded more quickly, but that she put more effort into physical therapy.
  • Woman in her early 40s – I actually met her in my basketball league and knew she had tore it at some point because she was wearing an ACL knee brace. She had some amazing movement at point guard. I wouldn’t have guessed her age based on how she was moving. I found out later it had only been a few years since her tear… and she actually tore hers playing flag football in the same recreational league that I participated in!

So as you can see, ACL tear recovery can have a wide spectrum of results. I think for most people, if you put the effort toward physical therapy and returning to sports, that you’ll be back before you know it! Follow your doctors’ guidelines and you’ll be just fine.

A Secret to Marathon Running Success

Some of the world’s most successful athletes have a secret weapon when it comes to staying competitive.

The secret?

It’s Compex muscle stimulators.

Electrostimulation has been shown to improve stamina, increase strength and speed, help blood circulation, speed up recovery after a workout and provide other improvements to performance. Marathon runners benefit especially from muscle stimulators to increase their endurance while running. Of course, the other benefits also help… especially for an marathoner that’s focusing on training.

Electrostimulation devices work by gently contracting your muscles, which exercises them without the fatigue that comes with long workouts. So, you can train your body effectively without impacting your joints. Combined with your regular workouts, muscle stimulators can take your fitness to the next level. Compex is widely known as the leader in muscle stimulators – the Compex brand is a secret weapon of professional athletes such as triathlete Chris “Macca” McCormack.

If you’re looking for a way to improve your performance and your marathon times, then check out Compex muscle stimulators to gain an edge on your next race. Be sure to consult with your physician to ensure that electrostimulation is an appropriate training method for your situation.

Foot Pain After Sports? It Could Be Plantar Fasciitis

When you think of injuries during sports, people commonly think of conditions such as ankle sprains and ACL tears. However, there’s one type of injury that often affects athletes that is more common than people realize.

Behind closed doors, many athletes suffer from plantar fasciitis. This includes notable athletes such as Kobe Bryant and Pete Sampras.

What is plantar fasciitis?

In your foot, there’s a fibrous piece of tissue known as the plantar fascia that goes between the heel to the toes. When this band of tissue becomes inflamed, it causes pain in the foot. The condition is therefore called plantar fasciitis. It can occur in all types of patients, which is why it’s not known as a “sports injury”.  Since an athlete is naturally more active, he or she may stress the areas around the foot and lead to inflammation.

Here are two forms of pain relief that we recommend at BetterBraces (and you’ll want to check in with your doctor to make sure these forms of treatment are appropriate for your situation):

  • Wear a brace for plantar fasciitis when participating in sports. This can help reduce the stress on the foot and may relieve or prevent pain so you can keep playing.
  • Wear a plantar fasciitis night splint when you sleep. Plantar fasciitis night splints help with pain by keeping the plantar fascia stretched out overnight. (Typically the worst pain from plantar fasciitis occurs in the morning after waking up… night splints can help relieve this pain.)

If you’re experiencing foot pain after sports, you may want to check in with your doctor to see if it could be plantar fasciitis!