3 Tips to Prevent Volleyball Injuries

Holly B. is an active professional in her late twenties who spends her free time playing recreational flag football and league basketball. She shares her experience with us as she explores the world of sports.

I have several friends who actively play recreational volleyball. One friend in particular, Clarence, is fairly tall – great for volleyball, not so great for his joints. He has to be careful to not to overdo things when playing.

The lateral movement and repetitive jumping during volleyball sets up the perfect scenario for injuries to occur… especially with taller athletes whose body frames may put more strain on their joints.

Here are three tips to help prevent volleyball injuries:

1. Warmup before games – Make sure that you stretch and take a light jog before games. This gets your muscles and joints ready for action. Some trainers recommend a light stretch, then a light jog, then more stretching.

2. Ensure that you have the proper gear – Check the wear and tear of your shoes and socks. Wear knee pads and elbow pads to protect yourself when diving. (Check out our selection of knee pads and elbow pads for volleyball.)

3. Wear volleyball braces and supports – If you have previous ankle or knee injuries, it’s smart to wear a volleyball brace or support to help protect your joints from re-injury. They may also help prevent injuries from occurring the first time. While volleyball supports won’t guarantee that you won’t get hurt, they do help lower your risk.

Recreational volleyball is enjoyable – I’ve had the pleasure of watching Clarence participate in some intense games. But be sure to stay safe while playing!

Caring for a Sprained Ankle with the Aircast Air Stirrup

If you’ve suffered an ankle sprain, your doctor may recommend the Aircast Air Stirrup Ankle Brace because it’s one of the leading supports for recovery from ankle sprains.  It’s designed to help patients get back to an active lifestyle as quickly as possible.

Check out the video below for some information on how to care for your sprained ankle using the Aircast Air Stirrup (it’s an older video, but still some great tips!) It’s a great watch, even if you’re using another ankle brace or if you don’t have an Aircast Air Stirrup Ankle Brace yet:

Ready to learn more? Click here to shop for an Aircast Air Stirrup Ankle Brace.

Common Marathon Running Knee Injuries

In a recent blog post, we reported about the increased participation in marathon running and how the number of marathon injuries are also increasing as a result. These injuries occur because of the impact that your joints – in particular the knee – absorb during running.

Here are some common marathon knee injuries that may occur from excessive running:

Runner’s Knee (also known as chondromalacia or patellofemoral pain) – This condition describes irritation under the kneecap. The cartilage under the kneecap usually glides smoothly as the joint bends, but if it rubs against one side of the joint during movement, it can cause pain. Repetitive movement, most often associated with running, can increase your risk of runner’s knee – though this condition can be observed in non-runners as well. (Got runner’s knee or want to help prevent it? Check out knee braces for runner’s knee.)

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (also known as ITBS) – The iliotibial band is a long, thick mass of tissue that goes from the hip to the outside of the shin bone. It works with your thigh muscles to stabilize the knee. During repetitive movement, such as from marathon running, the iliotibial band may become irritated. This pain can sideline a runner so it’s best to take measures to prevent ITBS from occurring by having proper footwear. (Got Iliotibial Band Syndrome or want to help prevent it? Check out knee braces for ITBS.)

Patellar Tendonitis (also known as jumper’s knee) – This type of injury is an inflammation of the tendons around the knee joint. Though knee tendonitis is usually a stress injury seen with repetitive jumping, it’s also frequently seen in runners. Marathon runners who are often running on hard pavement are at an increased risk. (Got knee tendonitis or want to help prevent it? Check out the DonJoy Cross Strap, one of the best knee braces to alleviate patellar tendonitis pain and to help prevent occurrence.)

If you’re a marathon runner, take steps to protect your knee joints. Speak with your doctor at the first sign of knee pain to get the appropriate treatment for your injury.

Marathon Running Injuries on the Rise

Participation in marathon running has been steadily increasing since 1990. According to Running USA, the number of participants has nearly tripled between 1990 and 2011. At BetterBraces.com, we’ve noticed that with the increase in marathon running, also comes an increase in marathon running injuries.

Though marathon running is a relatively safe sport, the repetitive nature of running and jogging can cause stress injuries in the knees and ankles. There are some steps you can take to prevent marathon running injuries. If you’re a marathon runner, be sure to stretch before and after working out. Many runners also find it beneficial to stretch a bit, warm up, then stretch some more before going into full training mode.

It’s also important to have the right gear. Ensure your shoes (and even your socks) are the appropriate size and fit, and that the soles and padding have not worn out. You may want to consider wearing knee braces for running or ankle braces for running. These braces can help absorb the shock to your joints from the repetitive stress that comes with marathon running. It’s especially important if you’ve had a previous knee or ankle injury.

Remember to keep your joints happy and healthy!

Running USA: http://www.runningusa.org/statistics